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New Zealand Herald ad 1955

Having a look at the New Zealand City & Area Directories, 1866-1955 this week, I came across this ad for the NZ Herald newspaper from 1955.

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With circulation of 156,000 copies daily the ad notes the paper dominates Auckland which in 1955, had a population of 800,000 (it’s now just under 1.4 million).

Advertising in the Herald was just 2.14 pence per column inch for every 1000 subscribers!

Directories are a great resource for family historians and are particularly useful for locating people in a place and time. The ads and commercial sections of the directory can also help you learn more about your ancestors’ occupation.

Search our NZ City Directories today. 

Sounds Historical

Ancestry’s Brad Argent recently caught up with Jim Sullivan from Radio New Zealand Sounds Historical.

Brad discusses his own family history, tips on getting started with your family tree & genealogy in general.

You can listen to the interview here - click on Sounds Historical Hour Two and Brad’s interview starts at 21 minutes in.

Pets on the 1911 UK Census

Today is National Dog Day!

The Glasspoole family included their dog Spot, their cat Tom and 11 white fowls on their 1911 England Census form.

Do you have a pet you consider part of the family?

Access the 1911 England & Wales Census FREE on Ancestry.com.au until 14 October 2013.

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Welcome to the August edition of the Ancestry.com.au family history podcast.

This month, Ancestry’s Brad Argent has answered the following questions from our Facebook page -

  • How can I get someone to translate Dutch information?
  • How can I confirm that I have the right person in an 1840’s marriage in NSW without buying certificates?
  • What are your top tips when searching for common names?
  • When are Australia’s census’ available?
  • I think my family might be Spanish but there’s nothing in the records to suggest this. Any ideas?
  • How can you get old photos dated?
  • When will you be adding German records?
  • Why can we not see the actual documents for the Australian BMDs on Ancestry?
  • Trying to find BMD info in NZ but not having any luck with the Registry’s site. Any tips?

Got a question for Brad? Simply post it on our Facebook page or use the Twitter hashtag #AskAncestryAU.

You can also download our podcast free from iTunes.

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Welcome to the July edition of the Ancestry.com.au podcast.

This month, Ancestry’s Brad Argent has answered the following questions from our Facebook page -

  • David and Erin are trying to trace New Zealand ancestors and want to know if Ancestry has any records. They also want to know where do they go from there?
  • Barbara and Daphne want to know what you do if you can’t find a birth certificate or any evidence of someone coming into Australia?
  • Helen is struggling to find ancestors who came to Australia towards the end of the 1800’s. Why are immigrants from this period so difficult to trace?
  • Jessica pointed out that some of the Electoral Rolls aren’t indexed which can make it challenging to find someone as you have to know the subdivisions/districts they were in first. But that’s going change, isn’t it?
  • Kathleen can’t find a marriage record in Sydney for the early 1850’s. Why?
  • Kerryn is trying to trace cousins in the UK from early 1900’s.  What does she do?
  • Leanne asks “Is there a way to find some one’s birth record if you don’t know their parents names?”
  • Melissa wants to know “What was the likelihood of women in their late 30’s or early 40’s having children in the 1800’s?”
  • Neve think’s there might be Indigenous connections in her family 5 or 6 generations back. Is there a way she can trace this?

Got a question for Brad? Simply post it on our Facebook page or use the Twitter hashtag #AskAncestryAU.

You can also download our podcast free from iTunes.

Brad Argent - Podcast 4
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Welcome to the June edition of the Ancestry.com.au podcast.

This month, Ancestry’s Brad Argent has answered your questions on Outward Passenger Lists, newspaper resources online, polish records, member connect, family trees and Tasmania convict records.

Got a question for Brad? Simply post it on our Facebook page, use the Twitter hashtag #AskAncestryAU or submit via Tumblr.

You can also download our podcast free from iTunes.

F Scott Fitzgerald spotted in 1920 Census

Great Gatsby author Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born on 24 September 1896 in Minnesota.

Here he is on the 1920 U.S. Census, aged 23, living with his parents Mary and Edward, sister Annabelle and servant Margaret.

His occupation in 1920? Author and writer. His first novel, This Side of Paradise was published a short time later in March 1920.

In the same year, Fitzgerald married novelist Zelda Sayre and their daughter Frances was born in October 1921. He went on to write 3 other novels including his most famous, The Great Gatsby.

F Scott Fitzgerald died on 21 December 1940. He is buried with wife Zelda in Maryland, the gravestone inscribed with the final sentence of The Great Gatsby - “So we beat on boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the wind”.

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Ancestry’s Brad has been working on researching the family history of Brisbane talk back radio host, Gary Clare. Last week Brad spoke with Gary to share his story on 4KQ.

Click on the link above to listen to a recording of the show.

Clip courtesy of 4KQ radio.

Brad Argent on Nightlife

Ancestry’s Brad Argent joined Tony Delroy on ABC’s Nightlife last week to talk about Great Gatsby family trees and the NSW Industrial School Registers, 1867-1925

Listen to Brad’s interview with Tony Delroy on the ABC Nightlife podcast website here.

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We hope you enjoyed our first family history podcast and thanks to everyone who submitted questions for our April edition.

This month, Ancestry’s Brad has answered your questions on convicts, immigration, Irish ancestry and more. 

Got a question for Brad? Simply post it on our Facebook page, use the Twitter hashtag #AskAncestryAU or submit via Tumblr.